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2015 Honolulu


Race News

Honolulu, Hawaii - A loud and resounding "Aahh - looohh - haaahh!" is how the final awards ceremony began for the 48th Transpac in celebration of not only the achievements of the winners in this 2225-mile ocean race, but the dozens of beautiful perpetual trophies that symbolize the deep heritage and traditions in the 111-year history of this classic ocean race, organized biennially by the Transpacific YC.

The evening's opening act of Hula dancing celebrated the strong influence and richness of Hawaiian culture integral to this race, which was born of an idea by Hawaii's King Kalakaua in the late 19th century to enhance his nation's ties to the mainland.


Honolulu, HI – With the arrival today of the final finishers in the 2225-mile LA-Honolulu Transpac, race organizers from the Transpacific YC may now declare the race concluded for its 48th edition.

Yasuto Fuda’s Feet 30 Fortissimo 11 may have taken over 17 days to finish the course, but the small Italian-built sportboat with a crew of four intrepid sailors from Japan persevered through some tough conditions to arrive today as the final finishers in the race.


Honolulu, HI – As the three remaining boats traverse the remaining 200 miles towards the finish line to come in sometime pre-dawn tonight, all nine division winners have been determined for the 48th edition of the 2225-mile biennial LA-Honolulu Transpac.

These include the following: Division 1: Roy P. Disney and Robert Oately’s R/P 100 Wild Oats; Division 2: Craig Reynolds’s TP 52 Bolt; Division 3: James MacDowell’s Santa Cruz 70 Grand Illusion; Division 4: Greg Slyngstad’s J/125 Hamachi; Division 5: Eric Gray’s Santa Cruz 50 Allure (who won by a mere 2 min 52 sec after nearly 7 days of racing!); Division 6: John Chamberlain and Dean Fargo’s Swan 651 Second Wind; Division 7: Harry Zanville’s Santa Cruz 37 Celerity; Division 8: Tracy Obert’s BBY Custom 59-foot ketch Marjorie; and Lloyd Thornburg’s Gunboat 66 Phaedo in the multihull Division 0.

Grand Illusion has now equaled the record for most overall wins, joining the 88-foot Lurline which won the first two races in 1906 and 1908, and again in 1912. However, Grand Illusion holds the status alone for winning overall three times under the same Owner/Skipper.

What was the pathway to success in this race, given the unusual weather patterns this year? The answers are somewhat varied for each division winner, but in general a northerly route without straying too far kept the right balance between sailing excess distance versus sailing faster by being in stronger winds.


Monday July 13 Start

Yacht Sleeper flew protest flag reported that they had completed two turns.

Picante taking on water around keel.  Returned to San Pedro, all crew well, boat returned safely.

Vivacia taking on water from deck.  Returned to So Cal, all crew well, boat returned safely.

Avanti had rudder structure damage, taking on water.  Returned to Marina del Rey, all crew well, boat returned safely.

Bazinga suffered rudder failure.  Returned to San Diego.  All crew well, boat returned safely.


Honolulu, HI – Boats from the two classes that symbolize Transpac more than any other have taken the top of the leaderboard in the 48th edition of this biennial ocean racing classic. Local-based James McDowell on his Santa Cruz 70 Grand Illusion has taken the top of the provisional results in overall ORR scoring, followed by Chuck Nichols racing the Andrews 70 Pyewacket, with Craig Reynolds’s TP52 Bolt in third place.

Results are considered Provisional untill all boats are finished and any protests have been resolved by organizers from the Transpacific YC.


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Blogs from the Boats

DAY 12: Shark Gazers and Alien Watch

“It ain’t no J Crew ad out there, honey.” - Elizabeth

At any given moment, a sailor can make any number of mistakes, ranging from the dangerous (grabbing a running halyard), to the humorous (Scott inflating his PFD while sliding into the nav station). Today, we discovered we’d committed mistake perfection: We’d filled Hokahey’s water tanks too high.


After some 2225 miles of ocean racing, we just about have the finish line in sight!

Well, here aboard Hula Girl we certainly had our trials and tribulations on this one. The light and difficult conditions for the first days of the race made for some really tough going. Then I got us stuck in a lane too far south where we simply didn't have the wind that our competitors to the north had. But, as strange as it may sound, as we sail for the finish line now, coming around the eastern end of Oahu into the Molokai Channel with preparations beginning for the final gybe towards Diamond Head, I don't think I would risk changing much about this race.


Hey all friends and family, just a bit overdue in getting out a report from onboard Hula Girl in the 2015 Transpac, but here we go.

So after our slow start and getting pinned in the funk- wind plagued southern lane on the way to Hawaii, we finally managed to get out and into the Trades. And man, is it nice. We have had beautiful days of great sailing in winds mostly 18- 22 knots. The squall activity has been mostly light, with the busiest night having been Friday night. But even then, the mid to high 20s what the breeziest we saw


"We protect the NORTH! Dare to come past the 33 latitude, we will find you and lee bow you!" - Groggy pit man

Glorious wind! We savored the feeling of it whipping around our ears and pushing us across the Pacific. Our northern route around Hurricane Dolores' dead zone was longer and colder, but after two days without breeze we felt like 11-yr-olds earning back Xbox privileges after a long period of confiscation. Hokahey was back.

The crew took turns at the helm, competing with each other for fastest driving time. We maneuvered the boat to surf northern swells. Spray flew across deck. Elizabeth and G4 were tied in first place for most of today, with a high speed of 13.2 knots. At dusk, JT pushed Hokahey to 13.3 knots. Just when we were about to award him Top Gun title, 19-year-old Connor surprised everyone with a speed of 14.3 knots. Not too shabby for a young scallywag, eh?


Day 11

TURN DOWN FOR WHAT

"Pay to play sailors got a great deal this year. Pay 10 days get 5 days free!"
-Sarge

Most northern monohull on any Transpac ever! We raised our gloved fists toward the heavens, as we gathered round the cockpit for our half way point celebration. Then, shaking with laughter, we scarfed pickled sweet potato salad and rosemary leg of lamb out of our plastic boat bowls. We'd all been looking forward to this occasion, for which Jeff had donated and prepped such luxurious grub. However, we'd expected to meet the the half way mile marker about two days earlier, and we certainly had not expected to be sailing the 34th latitude.


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