Presented by


Latest News

It was 40 years ago Merlin changed the course of Transpac – and ocean racing – forever… now she’s back, faster than ever

HONOLULU, HI – Today a Transpac legend crossed the finish line at Diamond Head 40 years after she did it the first time: Bill and Lu Lee’s venerable Lee 68 Merlin. Her elapsed time of 8 days 02:34:09 did not set any records this year, but this was still better than the elapsed time of 8 days 11:01:45 that she set in her original configuration when Lee and his team raced her in a very windy 1977 Transpac, a testament to the upgrades made to the boat over her long and storied life.

“Lu and I are the eighth owners of this boat for the second time,” said Lee, who navigated this race to be second (currently) in corrected time behind another legendary finisher today, Roy Pat Disney’s Andrews 68 Pyewacket. Disney’s newer boat rates slower than Merlin, so being only 2 hours behind but allowed several more hours gave her the corrected time edge. Nonetheless, Lee said they had a fantastic race on Merlin.

“We had no major failures or breakdowns, and this boat has had 7 keel changes, 4 mast changes, deck layout changes and countless sails through its life. Right now it is set up nicely. She sails better, easier and faster than the original boat, so much so its really a different boat and a pleasure to sail.”

It was this boat that in 1977 turned offshore yacht design in an entirely new direction when Lee’s design concept was to keep the boat long, narrow, and intentionally light weight to sail efficiently in the offwind races of the US West Coast, yet to also be at the prevailing IOR Rating of 70.0 feet, which was the defined Maxi rating limit of those days. Other conventional IOR Maxis were often referred to as “lead mines” because of the large keels they needed to keep their stability for their massive sails and 80-foot lengths. The conventional Maxi’s of this era were designed to perform well relative to their rating in all conditions, whereas Merlin excelled in one direction alone: downwind.

It was this design feature that then prompted a new generation of ULDB (Ultra Light Displacement Boat) designs to not necessarily rate well and win on corrected time, but to be first to finish. When Merlin set a new race record in 1977, she not only beat it, she smashed it by defeating Windward Passage’s record time set in 1971 by over 22 hours. So remarkable was this boat that this record stood for 20 years before beaten by Pyewacket in 1997.

And here she was again: finishing at Diamond Head under sunny skies and tradewinds with the same rainbow color scheme on her spinnaker that she had in 1997. Lee even donned his Wizard cape at his team’s Aloha party at Hawaii YC, just to complete the nostalgia.

Asked about his vision of the future of this race, Lee said “I think it will continue to do what it does now: it attracts the really fast boats with all-pro crews who will continue to hunt for records on big 49-ers, and the amateur teams who are sailing boats they can handle comfortably. There’s a lot for both in this race.”

Read more

HL Enloe and the crew of the ORMA 60 trimaran Mighty Merloe crossed the finish line on July 10 of the 49th Transpac Race, beating all entrants and eclipsing the 20 year old multihull record of Bruno Peyron’s Commodore Explorer by more than a day, previously set at 5 days 9 hours 18 min and 26 secs.

Read more

Post Race Interview with Gavin Brady of the Invisible Hand Pac52. Invisible Hand is currently standing 1st in Class and 1st in ORR Overall in the 2017 Transpac Race.  

Q: What was the most challenging part of the race for you?

A: The build up. The 3 days before the race. There was a lot going on, a lot of things had to come together quickly. There was one of those moments where if everybody achieved their goals, we knew that when we got to the start line on the same piece of water as our competitors we were going to have an edge.

Q: How much strategy was directed towards beating Bad Pak.

A: I think not a lot of strategy was put towards just Bad Pak, because we felt that each team would actually push each other harder. So if we were on the same piece of water, we've raced against them in 3 of the Pac52 series, we know their performance, we're sister ships so we've got the same boats, and the modes are the same. We knew what they had, and they know what we've got, so I think we felt that actually working with them was an asset, and then let the games play out in the Molokai Channel. So we were thinking it was going to come down to 3-4 miles in the last part of the race. We thought them being strong was an asset, we wanted them to be strong so they would push us. So to be honest, we did in the last 3 days probably leave a little on the table by being more defensive rather than attacking. We sort of jibed across and took some wind shifts that we normally wouldn't have just to basically let the clock run down and be safe so I think in some ways not having them close to us actually cost us some on our performance.

Read more

Interview starts at 5:30 mark of video.

 

Read more

Nursing missing a missing port rudder, team perseveres to repeat their win from last year; Invisible Hand finishes as provisional corrected time leader

HONOLULU, HI – In the pre-dawn hours this morning, Manouch Moshayedi’s Bakewell-White-designed Rio 100 crossed the finish line at Diamond Head to be the first-to-finish monohull without powered assistance, and thereby winner of the historic Barn Door Trophy in the 2017 Transpac. With an elapsed time of 6 days 17 hours 9 min and 9 sec, Rio 100 once again joins a long and storied list of classic ocean racing yachts that have won this trophy every other year since it was first awarded to H.H. Sinclair on Lurline in the very first Transpac race in 1906…it may be interesting to note Lurline’s time was nearly twice that of Rio’s.

“I credit this great crew for this victory,” said Moshayedi, clearly relieved to have finished both intact and ahead of their nearest qualified rival for the Barn Door, Frank Slootman’s Pac 52 Invisible Hand. “Their expertise and seamanship saved both the boat and our chances to repeat last year’s win.”

With the suggestion made by TPYC Commodore Bo Wheeler, the team took a group photo with the trophy at their Aloha party at Waikiki YC, just before the effects of jubilation fueled by mai tai’s had many swimming in the pool.

Next in line at Diamond Head several hours later with an elapsed time of 7:01:20:10 was Invisible Hand, the latest-generation Pac 52 whose design heritage started here with this race. Unlike the current-generation TP 52 class yachts competing in the 52 SuperSeries events in Europe, these boats have higher freeboards for livability below decks and less water on deck, and are built to meet Category 1 offshore safety regulations.

On board with Slootman was one of the Pac 52 Class originators Gavin Brady, who came up from his native New Zealand to compete in this year’s race. After downing a pineapple Mai Tai at the dock, Brady and team with discipline pulled out the sails, flaked and bricked them, even the blown up A2 spinnaker.

When asked if this sail casualty hurt them, Brady said “Nah, we had two other A2’s of slightly different design. These were the only kites we had aside from an A4 if it got really windy.”

Reflecting on the race, one of several Transpacs he’s done (last year with Rio 100), Brady said “This is a great race, and the boat was great too. This new generation of Pac 52’s are getting back to the original offshore/inshore design concept. We were fast, but I told the guys we had another 10 miles a day we could squeeze out of the performance if we were more aggressive on gybing on shifts.”

Read more

Just after 3:00 AM on Wednesday, July 13th, Manouch Moshayedi's Rio 100 crossed the finish line of the 2017 Transpac Race, winner of the Barn Door Trophy for the second consecutive race! Rio's elapsed time of 6 days 17 hours 9 minutes and 9 seconds was over 12 hours faster than their Transpac Race in 2015. Congratulations to Team Rio and Aloha.

This was the second fastest elapsed time for any Transpac Barn Door winner in the history of the event.

Read more

Barn Door Trophy winner nears the finish, while stories abound from the race course as the fleet grows nearer

HONOLULU, HI - As the first wave of record-breaking boats have finished, there is a break in the action at race HQ in the Ala Wai Marina before the second wave is soon to arrive in the 2017 Transpac.

Among the front-runners it looks as though Manouch Moshayedi's Rio 100's hold on the Barn Door Trophy for being the first-to-finish monohull sailing without powered assistance in the sailing systems is fairly secure: at 1400 HST was 170 miles out going 15 knots. Assisted by a left shift in the breeze and being on port tack, she is close to being at her normal speeds and is outpacing Frank Slootman's Pac 52 Invisible Hand who was closing on her the last couple of days but is now 100 miles astern. At current speeds she is expected at Diamond Head after midnight tonight, with Hand expected about 8 hours later.

Next in line is the other new Pac 52, Tom Holthus's Bad Pak at 325 miles out, and then the remainder of the fleet will start coming in fast succession throughout the end of this week.

As the bulk of the fleet progresses west and south into the tradewinds, the weather gets warmer, layers of clothes get removed and the boats get flatter, giving teams more comfort to hit their keyboards and express themselves with their creativity. In the last couple days more and more teams are sending to Transpac YC race HQ their stories in words, photos and even videos.

Read more

Page 2 of 6 pages  < 1 2 3 4 >  Last ›



Desktop Race Tracking
or for IOS devices






June 29, 2017

VIP Mixer and Presentation by Farmers & Merchants Bank
Gladstone's Long Beach
1800 - 2100

June 30, 2017

First Start Kick-Off Party
Shoreline Yacht Club
1700 - 2300

July 1, 2017

Aloha Sendoff Party
Bandshell next to Gladstone’s Restaurant
1800 - 2200

July 2, 2017

Porsche Palooza and Yacht Review
Gladstone's Long Beach
1100 - 1600

July 3, 2017

First Transpac 2017 Start
Pt Fermin
1255 Warning

July 5, 2017

Second Transpac 2017 Start
Pt Fermin
1255 Warning

July 6, 2017

Third Transpac 2017 Start
Pt Fermin
1255 Warning

July 6, 2017

Multi Hull Transpac 2017 Start
Pt Fermin
1325 Warning

July 16, 2017

Pau Maui Happy Hour
Hawaii YC
1600 - 1900

July 19, 2017

Goslings Party
Hawaii YC
1700 - Close

July 20, 2017

Waikiki YC Party (Purchase tickets in advance)
Waikiki YC
1700

July 21, 2017

Navigator's Debrief
Waikiki YC
0930

July 21, 2017

Honolulu Awards Ceremony
The Modern Honolulu
1630 - 1930

July 22, 2017

Kaneohe YC Party
Kaneohe YC
1000 – 1700

July 2019

1st Start of 50th Transpac Yacht Race